Sunday, July 1, 2018

Sunday Devotional ~ Self-Control


A man without self-control is like a city broken into and left without walls. (Proverbs 25:28 ESV)
Horses have very little self-control. They are ruled by their instincts for survival. Fear ignites a very strong reaction in horses, but their survival instinct also triggers a form of selfishness. They will fight each other for food and water, especially if they feel it might be scarce, or if they are the least bit hungry. Greed causes them to eat well beyond full if allowed. When in training, they learn to bypass their natural reactions. The horse can learn to hold back their fight or flight instinct, even when afraid, because they trust their trainer. Even patience at the feed trough can be learned. When the trainer stands between two horses who would normally fight over their position at the feed trough, they will respect the trainer’s position and suppress the urge to bicker.
Likewise, self-control is a fruit of the Spirit. Only by leaning upon the strength of our God can we restrain what our bodies believe are natural instincts. What we feel like doing may not necessarily be what’s best for us. God knows this, and only by trusting Him in every situation can we learn to overcome our urges. If we trust God, we can conquer our fear; we may still be afraid, but able to act in spite of it. If we remember God’s position, we can withstand the need to bicker or fight with our siblings, neighbors, or co-workers. And when we believe God will provide for our every need, we can stop ourselves from over-indulging in any situation.





Howdy all! I visit each Sunday with a horse-related devotional for you to read and reflect upon. This is Day 20 of my devotional for horse lovers, Faith in Training. Hope you enjoy learning about how our relationship with horses can help us learn more about our relationship with God as well. Thanks for reading! ~ P. Creeden

Sunday, June 24, 2018

Sunday Devotional ~ Trusting our Provider


But let all those rejoice who put their trust in You; Let them ever shout for joy, because You defend them; Let those also who love Your name be joyful in You. (Psalm 5:11)
Horses in their natural state are always anxious. In the wild, their leadership can change as soon as a new horse discovers their herd. Battles between herds and leading stallions are common. Young stallions are kicked out of the herd as soon as they hit puberty and left to fend for themselves. There is no shelter from the elements. Inbreeding, famine, thirst, and predators are all commonplace. But when a horse is taken into captivity, he learns to trust his everyday handler as his leader. The handler provides food, water, safety, and constant companionship so that the horse can be set free from the anxieties of his feral life and find a happy calmness that is absent from life in the wild.
When we come to know God as our provider, we can trust that He will supply us with food, water, safety, and constant companionship, as well. If we trust that He will give us everything we need and protect us from the predators that lurk in our natural state, we’ll find ourselves set free from anxiety as well. That happy calmness will come to us naturally as we learn to depend on Him with all our hearts.





Howdy all! I visit each Sunday with a horse-related devotional for you to read and reflect upon. This is Day 19 of my devotional for horse lovers, Faith in Training. Hope you enjoy learning about how our relationship with horses can help us learn more about our relationship with God as well. Thanks for reading! ~ P. Creeden

Sunday, June 17, 2018

Sunday Devotional ~ Sticking with our Gifts


But the manifestation of the Spirit is given to each one for the profit of all: for to one is given the word of wisdom through the Spirit, to another the word of knowledge through the same Spirit, to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healings by the same Spirit, to another the working of miracles, to another prophecy, to another discerning of spirits, to another different kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues. But one and the same Spirit works all these things, distributing to each one individually as He wills. (I Corinthians 12:7-11)
Each horse is an individual, even within the breeds. Some Thoroughbreds are born for the track, while other Thoroughbreds are better at fox hunting, dressage, or trail riding. Not every horse will fit the mold of what a person may want to impose upon them. The gentle handler will not try to force a round peg in a square hole. The wise handler, instead, will see where the horse’s potential lies and school him toward the goal where the horse has the greatest chance of success. If a horse is pressed to do a task he is not physically or mentally prepared for, frustration of both rider and trainer will prevail.
Within the church, we may see a task we wish we were better suited for. It may seem as though the teachers and preachers get all the glory while the church maintenance crew or sound assistants gets ignored. So, we may feel we’d rather take on one role more than the other. But our gifts are as they should be according to God’s provision. The church needs the maintenance crew and the sound assistants just as much as any other role. Without each part of the church family, the church as a whole would not be the same. Whatever role we’re called to do, we should do it with gladness, and not try to push ourselves to do something for which we aren’t equipped.




Howdy all! I visit each Sunday with a horse-related devotional for you to read and reflect upon. This is Day 18 of my devotional for horse lovers, Faith in Training. Hope you enjoy learning about how our relationship with horses can help us learn more about our relationship with God as well. Thanks for reading! ~ P. Creeden

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Meeting Goals, Bribery Style

Hello again everyone! I'm Christi Corbett, one of the Brokken Road Romance series authors. Today I'm going to show you a fun way I keep myself on track when I'm working on a book...candy!!!

One this particular day I needed to edit a lot of pages, so I rewarded myself every time I finished 25 of them.



What about you? How do you encourage yourself to meet your goals/deadlines?



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Sunday, June 10, 2018

Sunday Devotional ~ Hold No Grudges


I, even I, am He who blots out your transgressions for My own sake; And I will not remember your sins. (Isaiah 43:25)
While establishing a rapport with a horse, the trainer must never hold a grudge. The trainer cannot get tense while going through an area where the horse spooked before. She cannot tighten her reins or choke up on the lead line. If the trainer prepares for spook or misbehavior, it has the potential to make the horse tense up and cause the very problem the trainer prepared for. And worst of all, the new horse expects the trainer to hold a grudge. He expects the trainer to punish him for behavior he hasn’t even done yet, because in the horse world, horses often hold grudges against each other. A good trainer never holds grudges.
God doesn’t hold a grudge against His child, either. No matter how many times we return to the same place and misbehave in the same way, He doesn’t anticipate the bad behavior to happen again, with punishment at the ready. Each time we misbehave after we’re forgiven, God’s heart is broken like it’s the first time. We may expect Him to hold grudges, because other people hold grudges against us, but God forgives us for His own sake.





Howdy all! I visit each Sunday with a horse-related devotional for you to read and reflect upon. This is Day 17 of my devotional for horse lovers, Faith in Training. Hope you enjoy learning about how our relationship with horses can help us learn more about our relationship with God as well. Thanks for reading! ~ P. Creeden


Sunday, June 3, 2018

Sunday Devotional ~ Praise and Punishment


A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. (Proverbs 15:1)
Science has suggested that for each negative comment a person receives, there needs to be twenty positive comments or positive situations to overcome and repair the damage. Training a very young or feral horse is a delicate balance. The young horse needs structure, so boundaries must be set. These boundaries keep both horse and handler safe and are necessary for life lived together. At times, the horse receives punishment for bad behavior, but the punishment cannot be too harsh. The positive reinforcement should be lavished on them, or no trust can be established, and the horse will only learn fear. Remember, the horse doesn’t know why the handler has set the boundaries. Nevertheless, he has to learn to respect them, even when he doesn’t understand.
Likewise, God sets boundaries for us. Although His hand may feel strict at times, we have confidence in Him because He has established trust in us by showing us His love through the provision of safety. Sometimes we learn why we have certain boundaries, and sometimes we don’t. We learn to respect them, even when we don’t understand. We learn to trust that God has only our best in mind when we believe in His promises and understand the love He shows to us. His gentleness and kindness to us is how we develop our trust and love for Him.





Howdy all! I visit each Sunday with a horse-related devotional for you to read and reflect upon. This is Day 16 of my devotional for horse lovers, Faith in Training. Hope you enjoy learning about how our relationship with horses can help us learn more about our relationship with God as well. Thanks for reading! ~ P. Creeden


Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Pictures are Worth 1000's of Details


Hello everyone! I'm Christi Corbett, one of the Brokken Road Romance authors. For today's post I thought I’d explore how difficult is was for me to make the transition from writing television commercials to writing my novels.
Television commercials have to convey a lot of information, all within a very short time frame–usually 30 seconds, sometimes 60. That is why everything is analyzed and double-checked to make sure what you want is portrayed. One incorrect detail can swing meaning a whole different way.
Look at this picture…

Without a single written word, this picture conveys so much.
Age of man
The man is old. Details that show this are the cane, the gnarled fingers, his caved-in mouth, and white hair.
Man’s Health
He suffers from a variety of ailments. Details that show this are his misshapen fingers and knuckles which may indicate advanced arthritis. His mouth is also slightly caved in, which could mean he’s got missing teeth or dentures. He also uses a cane, which could mean he has trouble with balance or the use of his legs.  Frail would be a good word to describe this man.
Lifestyle of the man
His hair and clothes are well-maintained (with the exception of his shoes, which could use a good shine), so I am guessing he appreciates neatness. Or, has a caretaker who does. And, if he has someone watching over him, that would indicate that either he’s got enough money to pay for a caretaker, or a family member has taken on the task.
Time of year
The season is a little bit harder to discern, but there are clues if you look hard. The tree behind him is filled with brown leaves, so I would say this picture was taken in the early fall.
Weather
You can surmise the day is mild because the man’s coat is light, and he’s not wearing gloves. The sun is out (indicated by the small shadow under the bench), yet not so powerful as to make the man squint. There hasn’t been rain in the past few hours, evidenced by the dry bench and stones. Plus, the man isn’t carrying an umbrella.
Location
The bench is well-made, but the finish on it is fading. The stones are high-quality, chosen for longevity and little required maintenance. The area is litter free. I’m guessing a college or a city square.
Now you see just how much can be gleaned from one picture. Amazing huh?
So, when I first started writing novels, I didn’t include character details like hair color, age, and body type.
Show versus tell was also REALLY hard for me to grasp. In television writing, the showing comes from the pictures/video and the script’s purpose is to tell about the product/storyline you’re trying to sell. In my early drafts of my first novel I was really big on “telling”, since I was used to the pictures and video “showing” what I was trying to convey.
Scripts also have their own set of punctuation and grammar rules. As for spelling, it is actually considered good form to spell out difficult words phonetically to make pronunciation easier on the voice talent. Numbers and proper nouns also have their own set of rules.
Another difference is the rampant use of commas, periods, and ellipsis to show voice talent where to pause a little (use a comma), a bit longer (a period) and a lot longer (ellipsis).  
As you can image, because of all of the above, my early drafts were a complete disaster. But I had thick skin and could set my pride aside with ease, so I trolled the internet, devoured “how to” books, joined a critique group, found a beta-reader, asked questions of other writers.
In general had no shame in admitting I had no idea what I was doing.
Because that’s how you learn to be a better writer.
How about you? What do you think this picture conveys?
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I love to hear from readers! Find me on the following sites:

Email: christicorbett@gmail.com
Twitter: @ChristiCorbett
Instagram: @ChristiCorbett

Sunday Devotional ~ Self-Control

via GIPHY A man without self-control is like a city broken into and left without walls. (Proverbs 25:28 ESV) Horses have very lit...